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  #1  
Old Sun 13 April 2008, 08:13
Glenn D
Just call me: Glenn
 
Baton Rouge, La.
United States of America
Interested in indexer - Baton Rouge, La. USA

Hi my name is Glenn I live In Baton Rouge Louisiana. I would like to know If there are members in Louisiana eather think of bulldng, building are have a MechMate. I would like to talk to you and see what is a good place to Start on my cnc. Thanks
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  #2  
Old Sun 13 April 2008, 08:55
sailfl
Just call me: Nils #12
 
Winter Park, FL
United States of America
Glenn

A good place to start is to read as many of the threads as you can. You will start to get a feel for what it takes to build one. If you know how you are going to use your machine, that will help because it is important to understand what size you are going to need. The control box will be same in most cases no matter how small or large you build your table.

There is a lot of good information on this fourm. Many of us have started in the same place you have. You will gain understanding as you read the threads. Ask questions that is how we all learn.

Good luck with your build. Gerald has given us a great machine to build.
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  #3  
Old Sun 13 April 2008, 14:22
Glenn D
Just call me: Glenn
 
Baton Rouge, La.
United States of America
NEW Guy not men guy

Thanks for the reply. There was a Shopbot for sale a few week ago in the paper, would it be better to start with a MechMate are just up date the old Shopbot ? I like the stronger gantrey on the MechMate. The router is better supported . glenn
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  #4  
Old Mon 14 April 2008, 06:31
IN-WondeR
Just call me: Kim
 
Randers
Denmark
Personally I think it would be best to build from scratch.
I think a upgrade of a shopbot is almost as extensive as building a mechmate from scratch.
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  #5  
Old Mon 14 April 2008, 08:08
Glenn D
Just call me: Glenn
 
Baton Rouge, La.
United States of America
New Direction

Thank for the reply. After reading more I think you are right I will start from scrach. I also see where a forth axes is added for turning. I think I could use this insted of $$$ a copy lathe$$$. The last thread was in 07 I have not found any other threads. I'm new and probably not looking in the right place. I do hope Gerald has had time to think on this subject. I do like his ideas. glenn
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  #6  
Old Mon 14 April 2008, 13:14
smreish
Just call me: Sean - #5, 28, 58 and others
 
Orlando, Florida
United States of America
If you watch closely here in the next 6 weeks, you will see the progress of the fabrication & installation of a new 4th axis on my MM. This has always been part of the original intent for my machine and I will pass on all the challenges and successes.
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  #7  
Old Mon 14 April 2008, 13:25
domino11
Just call me: Heath
 
Cornwall, Ontario
Canada
Sean,
Great to hear you are progressing on your 4th axis. I for one eagerly await your pics and results.

Heath.
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  #8  
Old Mon 14 April 2008, 14:06
Robert M
Just call me: Robert
 
Lac-Brome, Qc
Canada
Send a message via Yahoo to Robert M Send a message via Skype™ to Robert M
Glenn,

In my view & opinion, if an indexer is what you wish to add to your future CNC, defiantly I would suggest taking a step back in order to start from scratch vs upgrading a Bot. Iíve been in the back seen of this group for nearly 2ys in hope to find time & sufficient info for me in order to be at ease and build my version of a MM with such an indexer part of the main chassis. The name of my game is patience and step & step learning.
The only one in this group who has gone close to this is ART. Art did a unique MM version for his turning needs.
Whishing you all the best in your MM/indexer version. By the reply in this thread, we should be a nice bunch with an indexer (4th axis) soon !!
Robert
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  #9  
Old Mon 14 April 2008, 20:35
Glenn D
Just call me: Glenn
 
Baton Rouge, La.
United States of America
4 Axis (sound like a new THREAD )

Thanks to all who responded. On other forum I hadly got my question answered. Sure is nice to have such a Good group of people with the same interest. Sean I will be watching for your report and pic. I think I will clean out my shop and start collecting some iron. The Iron part and building I can handly. It's the wiring I'm concerened about. glenn
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  #10  
Old Tue 15 April 2008, 06:06
Doug_Ford
Just call me: Doug #3
 
Conway (Arkansas)
United States of America
Glenn,

If you don't have any experience with CNC, the first step I'd recommend you take is to investigate the software you'll need to write the G code for 4 axes. Lots of companies will let you download trial versions. I'd hate to see you end up spending major $$ on a machine that requires thousands of dollars in software and is really really complicated to run. Working in 2.5 dimensions is fairly simple. 3 dimensions doesn't appear that tough either but 4 dimensions has got to be pretty challenging.

I have no doubt that Sean will build a 4th axis and successfully run it but don't be led to believe that this task falls in the same category as changing the oil in your car or even rebuilding the engine. There are some REALLY smart guys on this forum and Sean is one of them.

Good luck.
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  #11  
Old Tue 15 April 2008, 08:47
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
The "indexer" side is very seldom 4 dimensions. Some indexer stuff is only 2D (when it is used as a lathe for turning smooth columns). Fluted columns and rope twists are at the 2.5D level.
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  #12  
Old Tue 15 April 2008, 17:47
Art
Just call me: Art #2
 
Lancaster,Texas
United States of America
I am happy to help in anyway I can. I made a lot of mistakes and hope I can help you not make the same mistakes.
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  #13  
Old Tue 15 April 2008, 18:25
Glenn D
Just call me: Glenn
 
Baton Rouge, La.
United States of America
Nothing ventured nothing gained

Thanks for the replys. The lathe part is to be used as Gerald said columns ,spindles and balaster. Others use a copy lathes to do this type work. If I only get the pleasure of building this machine it will be worth it to me. I have wanted to do this for some time, but never liked what was out there. Some were to small to weak are just plane trash. I'm sure this will take some time and Money. I have started collecting iron Job One glenn
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  #14  
Old Thu 28 August 2008, 21:51
Art
Just call me: Art #2
 
Lancaster,Texas
United States of America
Legay indexer

Buying pre built can be great but be sitting down when you see the price.
http://legacywoodworking.com/productList.cfm?new=yes
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  #15  
Old Thu 28 August 2008, 23:54
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
A good strong brand name commands high prices
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  #16  
Old Sat 30 August 2008, 16:35
Glenn D
Just call me: Glenn
 
Baton Rouge, La.
United States of America
Thanks Art/ Gerald You'r right, kind of pricey $$33,000$$ Well out of my range I had the legacy lath severial years ago Had nothing but problems sold it for $1000 to much back lash Watting for Gustav to move on My shop has flooded in the pass when we get Heavy Rain P.S. I did order there catalog to see how there put to geather glenn
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