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  #31  
Old Thu 28 January 2010, 08:17
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
Maybe VXB made a mistake then... I looked on their site a few days ago and the link I had for the 1RS would not work and I could not see it anywhere on their site... This morning I found this part which is designated 6001 ZZ and it has the metal shields... http://www.vxb.com/page/bearings/PROD/kit7141

I now have a total of 20 bearings with the metal shields. I need to order 8 more bearings for the V wheels in any case but if I could use the bearings I have now it would save 30.00 USD... How well do the metal shields protect the bearings against dust?
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  #32  
Old Thu 28 January 2010, 09:14
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
How long is a piece of string? I really cannot give a definitive answer.
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  #33  
Old Thu 28 January 2010, 09:36
sailfl
Just call me: Nils #12
 
Winter Park, FL
United States of America
Steve

Ask the people that are selling the part with the shields. They should be able to provide you with that information.
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  #34  
Old Thu 28 January 2010, 09:45
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Nils, you are not going to get a better answer out of them. It depends on too many factors; coarseness of dust, speed, tolerable contamination of the grease (ie. tolerable degradation of performance). The bottom line is that shields are not seals.
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  #35  
Old Thu 28 January 2010, 10:01
Kenrbass
Just call me: Ken
 
Richmond Tx
United States of America
How good is your dust collection going to be and will you ALWAYS use it? I would suggest the rubber.

When you fly cut an mdf spoilboard you will understand. lol

Kenneth
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  #36  
Old Thu 28 January 2010, 10:29
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Here is what our stepper motor bearings looked like behind the shields:

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  #37  
Old Thu 28 January 2010, 10:48
domino11
Just call me: Heath
 
Cornwall, Ontario
Canada
Did those bearings fail before they were replaced, or was it preventative maintenance. Those were in use for how long Gerald?
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  #38  
Old Thu 28 January 2010, 11:19
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
5 years with no dust collector. The left bearing was X-axis stepper motor, which failed to turn one day. Other bearing from y-axis motor (above the major dust stream).
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  #39  
Old Thu 28 January 2010, 13:33
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerald D View Post
The bottom line is that shields are not seals.
OK now I am on the right track...

The description on the VXB website was throwing me off....


6001-2rs " made of Chrome Steel and can rotate up to 15000 rpm, each bearing has 2 Rubber Seals to protect the bearing from dust or any possible contamination"


6001 zz " each bearing has 2 metal shields to protect the bearing from dust or any possible contamination"

I was focusing on their description and when they use the exact same wording it's kind of tricky



I am going to be using a large Delta dust collection system and will have the control box turn that on automatically when the MM starts up. A lot of dust is not going to be big factor... But for 30 dollars it is just not worth the hassle of changing them out down the road...

Last edited by swatkins; Thu 28 January 2010 at 13:38..
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  #40  
Old Sun 31 January 2010, 11:46
servant74
Just call me: Jack
 
Nashville (Tennessee)
United States of America
http://64.13.251.229/images/uploads/...ringSeal-1.pdf

Is an interesting quick description of seals and shields.

Basics are seals protect against finer particles than shields. Both are considered 'permanent lubrication'.

They are talking related to 'electric motors' and not steppers, that I am sure, put a different kind of stress on the bearings, especially in a dusty environment.

The worst environment I have heard about is running fans in a cement plant. The cement dust got inside seals on a regular basis, so even 'permanently lubricated' motors all had to be replaced every 6 months. It is possible for folks cutting granite to have the same kind of issues, I would guess. Thankfully wood shops are a bit different.
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  #41  
Old Sun 31 January 2010, 18:41
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
I'll bet replacing motors every 6 months is a huge expense. It would look like they could come up with some type of enclosure, that used positive pressure, to keep the dust out...

I ordered the new SEALED bearings last night along with the 8 bearings for Leo's belt drives..

A heads up for a Discount............

I ordered bearings from VXB.com and was pleasantly surprised to receive a 20.00 discount when I used the Google Check out... I think Google is pushing their service and they were giving 20.00 off on orders over 120.00
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  #42  
Old Tue 02 February 2010, 20:13
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
Houston.... We have BLUE!

The first part ready for paint was finished up last night... All that is left for this baby is a trip under the bearing press and she is officially the first completed part!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG00086-20100202-1753.jpg (56.5 KB, 1241 views)
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  #43  
Old Tue 02 February 2010, 20:14
sailfl
Just call me: Nils #12
 
Winter Park, FL
United States of America
Steve,

Ok, Blue is a good sign.
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  #44  
Old Tue 02 February 2010, 20:25
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
Finished the cutting of the X beams tonight... My table is going to be 100 inches long and a 20 foot section was just barely long enough to make both beams... The sharp "pointy" ends were just "a trap waiting to be sprung" so I wanted to blunt the ends, as others have done. The only way I could make the top blunt and still have enough material for both sides was to make a different cut....
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File Type: jpg end_layout.jpg (11.7 KB, 1238 views)
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  #45  
Old Tue 02 February 2010, 20:29
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
Here is a picture of the beams after I finished cutting and dressing the ends...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG00085-20100202-1156.jpg (72.0 KB, 1249 views)
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  #46  
Old Tue 02 February 2010, 20:32
jhiggins7
Just call me: John #26
 
Hebron, Ohio
United States of America
Steve,

Slick ogee design. I like it.

Hey, what's that John Deere doing there? Do you farm, or something?
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  #47  
Old Tue 02 February 2010, 20:43
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
That is a John Deere 1958 Model 730 Propane 2 cylinder tractor I am rebuilding... It's not mine and is being restored on a cost plus basis... It's a cool tractor that has been used very hard.. Almost everything leaks or is very worn...

I just finished rebuilding the PTO clutch , that's the assembly below the beams on the floor, and will install it tomorrow... Somehow water got into that housing and rusted everything together Its been a long hard road getting it back in shape as parts are hard to come by and I have had to make a few tools along the way. I have it running and after I rebuild the power steering system it should be a nice tractor...

I live in the country and lease my land to a man that runs cows on it... Great for tax purposes
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  #48  
Old Tue 02 February 2010, 22:25
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Gee, I got worried when I realised that I am older than that tractor and in similar condition
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  #49  
Old Tue 02 February 2010, 23:55
KenC
Just call me: Ken
 
Klang
Malaysia
Nice touch on the beam end.... So nice to have a plasma cutter in hand.
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  #50  
Old Wed 03 February 2010, 16:50
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerald D View Post
Gee, I got worried when I realised that I am older than that tractor and in similar condition
I'm right there with you Pal I am one year older than the tractor.....



Ken I wish it had been with a Plasma cutter.. Still doing things the old fashioned way,, With a torch
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  #51  
Old Wed 03 February 2010, 21:35
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
Made the bushings tonight....

Took about an hour to turn 6 perfectly good bolts into something they were never intended to be! Chucked them up, drilled them out then cut them off....
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bush1.jpg (62.3 KB, 1206 views)
File Type: jpg bush2.jpg (47.4 KB, 1207 views)
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  #52  
Old Wed 03 February 2010, 21:37
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
My little parts drawer is starting to look good
Attached Images
File Type: jpg draw1.jpg (74.7 KB, 1215 views)
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  #53  
Old Thu 04 February 2010, 06:33
KenC
Just call me: Ken
 
Klang
Malaysia
I just realized I don't have that M1 30 332 in my laser cut pack...
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  #54  
Old Thu 04 February 2010, 22:52
MetalHead
Just call me: Mike
 
Columbiana AL
United States of America
Ken I sent you a PM, but I see your not in the states . Check around you shop to see is it was dropped or under a flap on the box.
Also contact the cutter. They may have cut it and it fell on the floor or through the slats on the table.

Last edited by MetalHead; Thu 04 February 2010 at 22:58..
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  #55  
Old Fri 05 February 2010, 01:44
KenC
Just call me: Ken
 
Klang
Malaysia
No worries, I'll just hand make one, it will be faster then getting them laser cut. Problem is I need to find a piece of scrap plate.... some where... some how...
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  #56  
Old Mon 08 February 2010, 20:40
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
Wheels are finished!

Tonight I pressed in the bearings... I went ahead and ordered 28 of the rubber sealed bearings ...
IMG00110-20100208-1933.jpg

I used a small amount of loctite, just to make sure it was a "lasting" fit
IMG00112-20100208-1935.jpg

Because I hand made all of these tires on a lathe there was a little variance in the sizes.. After machining I measured all the tires and grouped them according to size.. It worked out that I have 6 of the exact same size and I will use them on the Z... 4 are .004 larger and 4 are .002 smaller. This works out well in that x, y and z will all have V wheels that are really well matched.. All the cam bushings and spacers are now ready for the Z plate and I have the bearings and screws ready for the skate as well...

IMG00113-20100208-2012.jpg

Working on the Z plate next!
IMG00115-20100208-2015.jpg
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  #57  
Old Wed 10 February 2010, 04:57
Robert M
Just call me: Robert
 
Lac-Brome, Qc
Canada
Send a message via Yahoo to Robert M Send a message via Skype™ to Robert M
Steve….
Hate assuming.... could you tell me what those tires of yours are made from ?
Thanks, Robert
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  #58  
Old Wed 10 February 2010, 05:03
MetalHead
Just call me: Mike
 
Columbiana AL
United States of America
Robert - I think he used a Brass Bar he had on hand for the V rollers.
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  #59  
Old Sat 13 February 2010, 23:57
swatkins
Just call me: Steve
 
Houston
United States of America
Finished the part I have been dreading!

Today I worked on the Z plate... I have not been looking forward to grinding the edges on this part, But it only took an hour and I think it turned out pretty darn good!

I have an old 10" Sears Craftsman table saw that Is nearly 30 years old.. It is a good saw but just a back up, now that I have a cabinet type saw, so I didn't mind using it to grind the z plate. I put a metal abrasive blade on, tilted the blade to 45 degrees and started taking light passes... I tried very hard to make the edge of the blade do the cutting because the blade is not designed to cut on the side.. Here is a picture I took about half way through the job...Sorry for the focus.

IMG00121-20100213-1720.jpg

You can see the blade setup on the saw and the edges of the plate need just a little more grinding to make the depth correct... Over all it was a great finish and I didn't even have to use a stone to dress it...

Next up was laying out the holes...
IMG00122-20100213-1720.jpg

Because I don't have a CNC mill ( YET ) I still do things the old way... Layout ink and scribing the parts on a granite surface plate.

IMG00126-20100213-1959.jpg

One of my most used layout tools is an optical center punch.

IMG00123-20100213-1721.jpg

It's very simple to use and consists of a metal base with two precision holes. There is a hardened steel center punch and a plastic magnifying target that fits the holes in the base..

You first place one of the holes over your marked line. Insert the plastic target into the hole and look through the end.. You will see a small dot in the exact center. The plastic target rod is polished in such a way as it magnifies the target end and lets you see the fine scribe lines with ease... It also lets light in through the sides of the rod so that it is well lighted at the surface..

Once you have have the small dot over your scribe lines you hold the base firmly and remove the target rod. You then insert the center punch into that hole and give it a bam with a hammer.. Perfect alignment every time!

IMG00129-20100213-2025.jpg

Here is a shot of the plate after starting to center punch. I caught a mistake here... I was a little confused on the drawing measurements and made one line too far over... I looked at the stiffener bar drawings and found the distance between the two rows of holes and corrected the layout before I drilled the plate...


And the finished plate and tube!

IMG00133-20100213-2320.jpg

My counter sink is not wanting to make the hole deep enough for the screw head to be flush. I think the holes are at the outer limit for this sink and the next size up is just too big... I tried using a drill bit to sink it deeper but there was too much chatter and the finish was not up to standards.. The screw heads are just a little proud so I might end up grinding them a little....

Last edited by swatkins; Sun 14 February 2010 at 00:03..
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  #60  
Old Sun 14 February 2010, 03:10
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Nice work Steve! As you say, this part is actually enjoyable
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