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  #31  
Old Sat 25 August 2007, 10:06
Greg J
Just call me: Greg #13
 
Hagerman, New Mexico
United States of America
CONGRATULATIONS Alan!!!!!!!!!!!

It is a rush, isn't it And for some odd reason,I bet that beer taste better than usual.

Lets see some pictures.

Greg
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  #32  
Old Sat 25 August 2007, 10:43
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Well done Alan!

I'll have a glass (or 3) of red wine in your honour tonight.
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  #33  
Old Sat 25 August 2007, 11:22
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
Here we go Greg A quick pic to prove there is no smoke

The black and white propellor disks on the motor shaft ends helps one to see small movements.

Gerald, I'll match your glass(s) with my own thanks
Attached Images
File Type: jpg its alive.jpg (115.1 KB, 2593 views)
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  #34  
Old Sat 25 August 2007, 13:32
Greg J
Just call me: Greg #13
 
Hagerman, New Mexico
United States of America
WOW!!! Very nice setup. The only problem is, my wife wants to know how come my setup isn't in the shop

Nice work Alan. I'll have a beer (after my evening run) and toast to your success.

Greg
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  #35  
Old Sat 25 August 2007, 13:40
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Greg, have you noticed that your Miller beer is produced by SABMiller. Ever wondered where the SAB part comes from?
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  #36  
Old Sat 25 August 2007, 18:22
Greg J
Just call me: Greg #13
 
Hagerman, New Mexico
United States of America
Gerald,

I'm not a big Miller drinker, but do drink allot of Henry Weinhard's when I can find it. Its also produced by SABmiller. This forum is just full of valuable information

I am going to try and locate some Windhoek. I worked in a winery for quite some time (they couldn't get rid of me). SA produces some very fine wines.

Geeez, I'm getting thirsty. I think I'll go for my run early. I'll have a toast to SA.

Greg
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  #37  
Old Sun 26 August 2007, 03:23
Belli
Just call me: Greg
 
Johannesburg
South Africa
Debounce timing.

Hi Alan,

No need to rewire your chassis plate, just go to General config and change your debounce timing to a small value like 10 or 20 and won't have any further trouble.

Cheers,
Greg
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  #38  
Old Sun 26 August 2007, 07:54
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
Thanks Greg, I will give that a try but I am going to replace those wires with shielded ones eventually.

Now can anyone recommend any good G-code tutorials/downloads, I have the MACH manual but am looking for more details and examples. I am used to programming on proprietry software (Biesse and SCM) so most of the coding happens in the background.

Regards
Al
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  #39  
Old Mon 27 August 2007, 10:54
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Alan if you had to program something for the Biesse, where would you start?
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  #40  
Old Mon 27 August 2007, 14:40
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
It would depend on the type of item I was working on. If it was a complex item such as a toilet seat (lots of curves with very few straight lines) I would obviously start in my CAD package and export a dxf to the Biesse software. Then would start a long and laborious process of ordering the lines and changing directions depending on how they were originally drawn. If this process was successful (make one wrong selection and you have to start again with the import...? The Italians know how to complicate matters) the software is then able to generate the coding for the program based on tool parameters entered etc. If it is a simple item such as a cabinet side panel for example all the programming is done within the software by just telling it outside dimensions, hole positions and depths etc. One does not get to actually work on the coding directly.

I have worked with Enroute before which is MUCH more user friendly and intuitive. I know I will be able to achieve most of what I want by using LasyCAM but I still want to understand how the machine thinks and processes code... I know, I'm inquisitive, that is usually what gets me into trouble
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  #41  
Old Tue 28 August 2007, 01:04
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
I once helped someone with a Biesse program and they didn't even have the facility (or know about it) to start with a dxf. We were so used to CAD and DXF's before CNC, that even a simple rectangle gets drawn in CAD first and then via CAM to code. Result is that we never bother to understand code either.

(Hope you don't mind that I moved the mystery poster to the Market thread. I reckon if a guy doesn't want to give a name and location he has another agenda?)
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  #42  
Old Tue 28 August 2007, 12:47
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
No problem with moving the mystery poster, I agree if they dont want to be identified maybe we dont want to know them...

Have been scratching around and found the EMC NIST site which has some useful info here it is open source so hopefully there is no problem with placing the link. I realise that it is specifically aimed at the Linux guys but the coding and interpratation seems the same.
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  #43  
Old Fri 07 September 2007, 01:02
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
New BOB on test

I received this recently from CNC Direct here in South Africa to test as an alternative to the other more well known boards available.

At first glance it is a very nice compact well made board with a good finish and it has some interesting features, most notable that it can be used as a full six axis board (obviously at the expense of other general outputs and charge pump output). Overall size is 160 x 100 x 50 (inc supplied standoffs) for the metrically challenged that’s 6.3” x 4” x 2”.

The board is powered by a 7v and 17v (AC) input supplied by the torroid transformer in the background. There are on-board rectifiers and caps to provide 10V and 24V DC (protected by 1amp fuses). The 24V is available to power off board load and as the positive for the 5 inputs (24V – Pin – Gnd). That should supply enough current to keep the switch contacts clean (discussed on another thread) and would work with appropriate proximity switches.

The bank of relays is driven by the outputs of pins 1, 14, 16 & 17 if these pins are not being used as step and direction signals – selectable by a row of jumpers behind the parallel port. Although these relays are rated at 12A, the manufacturer recommends keeping this to about 2amps because of the PCB track limitations.

The board is also capable of supplying a 0 to 10v signal for a VFD but I am not yet sure how to configure this, must be something to do with PWM and ports and pin settings? There is an input for a vari-pot so it is possible to manually override the set spindle speed.

The outputs to the Geckos (would one use anything else ) can supply both +5v and 0v so is compatible with both gnd common and +5v common drives.

Currently the Campbell board is working well in my test setup and I’m not too keen at this stage to go and rebuild that portion of the panel (note to self: must cut back on the time spent just admiring what I have achieved so far – is there a support group for someone with this affliction or does the forum suffice???) however this will definitely form the core of the panel for machine no 2 due to its size and features.

CNC Direct also has a power supply board to simplify the PSU construction and may also be working on an I/O board that has got my interest piqued – must have more inputs… the possibilities of things I can do with more inputs is endless and besides power is nothing without control.

(PS I am not employed by CNC Direct nor do I have any affiliation with the company and I am not endorsing this product but will give feedback to the forum once I have tested it. The decision to use the information supplied is entirely your own)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg CNC Direct BOB.jpg (117.4 KB, 2492 views)

Last edited by Alan_c; Fri 07 September 2007 at 01:19.. Reason: added disclaimer
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  #44  
Old Fri 07 September 2007, 01:03
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
Speaking of inputs I have managed with only the four inputs to achieve full homing and limits and pause and resume. I have wired the microswitches for Z, Y and X-left in series to one input and X-right to a second input. This works because when you home the machine in MACH it first moves the Z axis until the switch opens, and then backs off slightly, then the Y to the switch and off and then X. When the two X switches open (NC switches) the gantry backs off until both switches close again, then the X-right motor reverses again until that switch opens and then it backs off until its closed to leave the machine homed. The position of the switch ramp for the second x motor determines the squareness of the gantry. The other two inputs I have used for pause and start buttons as Gerald has done.

I still would like to be able to set up a Z-zero plate but have no more inputs, hence my desire mentioned above.

Does anyone know how to set up MACH to be able to do Z-zero with a touch plate of known thickness and how that offset can be fed into MACH so that tool length compensation takes place automatically?

I will not have an auto tool changer so every time a bit is changed the tool must be zeroed which tends to be fraught will all sorts of dangers and frustrations to achieve accuracy.

(mental picture in my mind of a young assistant doing a tool zero on a Multicam but forgetting to place the ground clamp on the tool as the spindle had ceramic bearings the sound of an expensive solid tungsten tool disintegrating as it tries to force its way through the touch plate is not one you erase from your mind in a hurry )
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  #45  
Old Sat 22 September 2007, 10:31
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
I have been working on the design of my angle iron trimming machine and decided to make a wooden prototype to test the concept. It is a combination of Geralds original idea and a sample on J.R.'s thread.

I felt it would be difficult to move a 3m (10ft) length of angle iron past a fixed grinder and still keep it under control. My moving grinder attachment rides on alwayse ball units (a steel ball riding on many smaller balls held captive in a cup). I had originally thought of using normal bearings on edge but was concerned with the tendency that they would have of moving off line if not travelling 100% parallel to the angle iron. With these ball units I will be able to apply side pressure as well as longitudinal pressure.

The prototype was made of some ply I had laying around in the garage so excuse the odd bit of paint and pen marks - I will be making a production model with steel as the ply has too much flex.

I am using a Ryobi angle grinder as its what I had available but then it comes with a hidden advantage. The gear head has metal threaded bushings that were originally used to mount the guard, this makes it easy to mount to the holding plate. It has three M4 threads and one M5 thread. I have used SS cap screws to mount the holding plate.

The four set bolts allow me to adjust the height of the cutting disk off the table as well as allowing me move it higher to mount a grinding disk to polish the top of the cut angle iron.

I dont like that bit of cutting disk exposed at the back so the production model will have a modified holding plate to cover the disk.

I did not have a sample piece of angle iron at hand so I have shown the assembled unit next to a length of timber instead.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 01 trim parts.jpg (103.6 KB, 2442 views)
File Type: jpg 02 grinder head.jpg (39.6 KB, 2443 views)
File Type: jpg 03 mount plate.jpg (36.8 KB, 2443 views)
File Type: jpg 04 with disk.jpg (40.4 KB, 2438 views)
File Type: jpg 05 base.jpg (37.8 KB, 2432 views)
File Type: jpg 06 complete unit.jpg (97.6 KB, 2437 views)
File Type: jpg 07 bottom view.jpg (120.2 KB, 2436 views)
File Type: jpg 08 mounted ball unit.jpg (43.3 KB, 2425 views)
File Type: jpg 09 working position.jpg (42.0 KB, 2424 views)
File Type: jpg 10 model no.jpg (39.8 KB, 2415 views)
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  #46  
Old Sat 22 September 2007, 14:44
J.R. Hatcher
Just call me: J.R. #4
 
Wilmington, North Carolina
United States of America
Send a message via Skype™ to J.R. Hatcher
Don't try to cut deep, I found this out the hard way. The cut will heat up and the 1/16" disc will suffer loss. The first 12' rail I cut down took about 4 disc, the second took almost as many. When I started the 8' rails I worked smarter by taking longer faster passes. The 8' rails took 1 disc each and a lot less time. Go easy when the disc cuts through, this is another place where you use up a lot of disc.
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  #47  
Old Sat 22 September 2007, 22:00
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Yes, you don't use a grinder like a table saw. A grinder touching red-hot metal just chews up the disk. Use an oscillating motion that moves the disk to cold metal all the time. (Those chop-saw cut-off grinders are terrible at chewing up disks)
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  #48  
Old Sat 22 September 2007, 22:19
Doug_Ford
Just call me: Doug #3
 
Conway (Arkansas)
United States of America
Beautiful craftsmanship Alan. I like the idea of moving the tool rather than the angle iron. I moved the iron and it was a real bear. I started out cutting the 8 foot pieces in case I screwed one up it would be cheaper to replace it. When I started cutting the 12 footers, I switched to a new silicon spray and it ended up creating a gooey mess that actually made it harder to push the steel. I didn't figure that out until I had cut for a couple of hours. I just assumed the 12 foot lengths were much heavier than the 8 foot lengths.
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  #49  
Old Fri 28 September 2007, 13:45
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
Gerald

While doing the countersinks on the y car end plates and gantry carrier plate (10 20 454) I noticed for the first time that the two carrier plates are bent up the same - not mirror images of each other. Will this cause a problem?

I know one of the other guys had the same problem but couldn't find that message to see the answer so sorry for the repeat question.
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  #50  
Old Fri 28 September 2007, 13:56
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Jeesh, you should find yourself a new supplier!

No problem with "handing" those plates. I drew them handed originally because I believed at that time I would be drawing wiring harnesses down to the last 10mm. This "mistake" is only going to affect which gantry tube you might use to pass the cable through . . . . if you run the cable up along the spring.

Which reminds me...do try and install the motors with their cable entry pointing down so that dust falls out. We have already destroyed the bearings in 2 stepper motors due to dust ingress.
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  #51  
Old Fri 28 September 2007, 14:52
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerald D View Post
Jeesh, you should find yourself a new supplier!
Naah - He's too valuable
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  #52  
Old Fri 19 October 2007, 05:16
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
I received these this morning from Superior Bearings, thanks Rick.

Quality looks very good and the price was extremely reasonable. The price of the complete package with shipping to South Africa was less than what I could get the V-tyres turned for here in Cape Town, and that was using ductile cast iron, it would have been more had I had the wheels turned from special steel and then hardened with the possibility of distortion etc. It would be cheaper if I could do them myself, but I dont have the equipment.

Overall a very good deal.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg v wheels 2.jpg (73.2 KB, 2276 views)
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  #53  
Old Fri 19 October 2007, 06:33
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Rick was a late discovery. I went down the DIY route when the local BWC/Hepco agents wanted about $60 per size 2 wheel. ("Star Pneumatics" or someone like that)
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  #54  
Old Sat 03 November 2007, 15:11
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
Spent the day at work today (as I have been last 3 weekends) doing major maintenance and cleaning on our auto spray machine so progress has been slow (not to mention financial constraints) but I have managed to weld up the Y car in the interim - pics to follow
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  #55  
Old Sun 04 November 2007, 00:43
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
If you want help with welding the table, my welder guys would be happy to help. They take on "private jobs" which they are allowed to do in their own time on my premises - they know how to read my drawings
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  #56  
Old Sun 04 November 2007, 07:08
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
Thanks for the offer Gerald, but its the steel purchase thats holding me up, not the welding ability (I used to be a coded mig welder - certification since lapsed) and I know your drawings so well by now, I could probably draw them from memory...
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  #57  
Old Sat 02 February 2008, 15:32
Alan_c
Just call me: Alan (#11)
 
Cape Town (Western Cape)
South Africa
Send a message via Skype™ to Alan_c
Progress - AT LAST

I am sure Gerald and the rest of my online friends had given up on me as there had'nt been a post for some months, but things are moving forward again...

Collected all the nuts, bolts, washers and other fasteners on friday - all in for R135.00 (about $20.00).

I have had some more laser cut parts done: Cable tray parts, grinder skate, cutter skate (my design), stiffening closures, upper strut bracket and hold down swing plate. Laser cutting and bending for these parts (11 items) R815 ($113) which is a bit steep, but as I dont have an established relationship with the laser cutters, they tend to rip the ring on the bending charging about R40 per bend. Guys with established business with them pay in the single figures for bending

Welded up the gantry today and tested the angle cutting jig on a piece of offcut 60x60. - works like a charm. I am hoping to cut down the two angles for the gantry tomorrow and then start on the bevel grinding.

I made some mods to the grinder skate to fit my Ryobi grinder but it has ended up putting the grinding wheel in a different position to the standard item, this means I have to drop lower to the angle to get the full grind. I may just extend the slots so that the grinder holding plate is able to move further across. ( this means I will also have to extend the cut out in the base plate as the grinding wheel will foul the edge) - pics to follow...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg gantry and y car.jpg (84.4 KB, 2015 views)
File Type: jpg cutting jig.jpg (57.8 KB, 2017 views)
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  #58  
Old Sat 02 February 2008, 19:34
smreish
Just call me: Sean - #5, 28, 58 and others
 
Orlando, Florida
United States of America
Alan,
Glad to see your back on the wagon! Nice rail cutting tool...I sure bet it glides nice.
Sean
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  #59  
Old Sun 03 February 2008, 08:00
Greg J
Just call me: Greg #13
 
Hagerman, New Mexico
United States of America
Hey Alan,

I never gave up on ya. I spent over 2 months working on my skate design (we won't talk about that any more) and a gantry crane, and people thought I had given up. Never happen!!

Finished up on the X and Y cable chains last night. I'll post pic's tonight.

All the discussion about limit switches, homing ... Man, I can't wait to get my MM moving.

Keep the pictures coming. It's looking good guy !!
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  #60  
Old Sun 03 February 2008, 11:31
Doug_Ford
Just call me: Doug #3
 
Conway (Arkansas)
United States of America
Looking good Alan!!
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