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  #1  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 13:05
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
It writes!! - Amsterdam, NL

Hi Guys,

I was wondering about the following:
I have a big CNC cutting assignment coming up which was confirmed today. Exciting.
It is big enough to return the costs a Mechmate build - from this assignment alone, if I will do the cutting on the Mechmate instead of outsourcing it.

So (as a long time lurker) I am now very tempted to pull the trigger on a build, since the thing will pay itself instantly ( if I see the majority of the hours I need to build it as an investment ). The main thing holding me back is I have about an 7-8 weeks deadline on this assignment. I think the cutting would occupy about 2 weeks of machine time ( 10 x 8 hours days - rough calculation after running my files through Mach 3 and adding time for mounting boards changing bits etc. )

Which would leave me a rough 4 weeks to build and 1-2 weeks to debug the machine, and then it has to be in full reliable production for 2 solid weeks, to allow me to be able to deliver 'just' in time. Obviously I am putting a lot of stress on myself having such a deadline, which can be a good ( it HAS to be finished) and a bad thing ( if it is not finished ) at the same time. I could devote my time and that of an employee to the build for about 4 hours everyday + evenings & weekends. So....

1) Could this be done at all, or am I asking for it ?

2) Whats is the standing build record for a full size MechMate and what's a rough average build time so far, if you do not count the very highs (multiple years) and very lows builds ( no idea what the record is )....anyone got any idea or even experience ?

2) Any other builders build their machine specifically with their first assignment already waiting/paying for it?


Ps. To give an idea where I start: I have good computer skills, am a experienced cad user, but have only got simulation experience with Mach3. I got Basic skills in electronics, but a friend who's electrician, I can weld (mig/tig) and have a workshop with most common tools, drill press etc. I outsource a lot of CNC work so I have a good understanding of the process, but never owned/build a machine before.

Last edited by Fox; Thu 03 January 2013 at 13:25..
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  #2  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 13:14
darren salyer
Just call me: Darren #101
 
Wentzville mo
United States of America
Far be it from me to be a naysayer, but I would hate to build machine #2 up against a timeline that tight, much less my first one.
Can it be done? Sure.
I'm sure its already been done.
Is it a good idea to have the deadline of a paying gig looming on the horizon while attempting a build in such a short time? Not for me.
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  #3  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 13:18
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
Hi Darren,

thanks for the quick reply.
I value your words as you have build 101, (great number btw), so your talking from experience.
What were/are the biggest hurdles/issues you encountered during your build, to base your advise on ?
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  #4  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 13:29
smreish
Just call me: Sean - #5, 28, 58 and others
 
Orlando, Florida
United States of America
With all your parts in a pile: Steel, laser cut parts, motors, etc....it can be done in a long 2 weeks. BradM and Seattle Rep Theater built 5x10 machines in just about a few weeks. My best record is 3.5 weeks (I've built a few). Most people take 8-16 weeks in the spare time. this is for a direct drive or Gearbox design. If you want belt transmission, add a few days.

Key to a quick build is limit your "out of the box" thinking. Use a dedicated computer for Mach and purchase a simple 2D toolpath creator like "cut2D".
Make your machine as simple as needed:
- simple 3 button stations on z-car and gantry
- no laser finder, no dust collection, no auto-z zero (all can be added later)
- Order the right cable chain - don't try to get fancy
- Use the correct steel shapes
- Use the grinder skate method with Sanding disks 36/50/80 grits in succession for a quick profile.
- Use common sense and good craftsmanship.....

building quickly is easy with a good set up.

My timeline went like this with 2 people:
1 person - only focus on electrics, control and wire for a whole 2 weeks, help lift, drag and clean when needed.

1 person fabricate:
- Cut steel (all of it) 1 day
- Drill all the steel 1 day
- build base table 2.5 days
- cut and profile rails 2 days
- build gantry 1/2 day
- build y-car 1/2 day
- build z - spider and z-slide 1 day
- build cable tray and track holder 1 day
- test fit all 2 days
- paint 2 days
- reassemble 1 day
- square and shim
- wire and terminate 3 days
- test
- cut parts

Elapsed time was right about 180 manhours

This was on machine #3 with a lot of experience (and a few jigs left over) - The first one (#5) took about 3.5 months in my free time

Last edited by smreish; Thu 03 January 2013 at 13:35..
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  #5  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 13:50
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
damn you guys are quick but that's great, as I need to kinda make the decision this weekend I guess !

Thanks Sean,

Really helpful post, KISS method sound a smart plan. Add the fancy stuff later when not really needed/whenever possible. The only thing I think that might be NEEDED though in my build is a vacuum as each 2 x 3 m sheet ( 60 or so in total ) contains many (80 or so) smaller parts. I think with the number of sheet it might be smart to invest the extra time in that ?? Screwing and and unscrewing all those quickly adds up time wise as well ?
Cut2d sounds like a good plan as well, downloading trial as we speak.

Ps. Already got the dedicated computer, screen etc.

Last edited by Fox; Thu 03 January 2013 at 14:00..
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  #6  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 14:08
smreish
Just call me: Sean - #5, 28, 58 and others
 
Orlando, Florida
United States of America
A quick vacuum setup is as easy as a few shop vacs and a "wafflegrid" etched in the top sacrificial spoil board. I made mine in a day on my old machine. Plenty of examples here on the forum or CNC zone or SHOPBOT forum. It's not hard to make a simple vac setup for use....the challenge is your best bet depending on part size is TAB your parts AND use vac.
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  #7  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 14:14
smreish
Just call me: Sean - #5, 28, 58 and others
 
Orlando, Florida
United States of America
I built my first table with simple tools:
- sawmax steel cutting circular saw
- 10" abrasive cut off saw for simple cuts
- 3.5/4" grinder (three of them set up differently to keep the tool change down.) One for skate, one for weld grinding (rough) one for sanding and fine grinding (fine) Its amazing how much time an extra 20 dollar grinder will save you!
- drill press with VERY Good lighting.
- cordless drill for tapping with pierce point spiral bit
- used only 3 sizes of holes/taps In the US It was 1/4" 5/16" and 3/8" - 12mm for carriage - limits the needs for many drill index's
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  #8  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 14:22
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
yeah I though so, I have to surface the spoil board anyway and milling the waffle grid could be my first programming after that. Seal the edges will take a day or so to dry out I guess, but then the basics should be there. I already have my eye on a industrial vacuum pump at a local surplus that could work. As I am going to be cutting clear PMMA and polycarbonate for this assignment, I would like try to avoid the tabs all together, so I have good edges straight off the table, so I will need a proper vacuum.

I already have dust collection running at my workshop, for starters I think I could just hack a hose from the ceiling and ducktape it to the spindle for getting out the most mess, and afterwards design a proper dustfoot. I guess two weeks of cutting it's nice that at least the basic stuff get out, instead of doing nothing at all.

We think alike; I already use 3 grinders in my workshop,3 cordless and 3 wired drills for exactly that reason, time saving... I have always 1 good 'expensive' one, and the other 2 tired/cheap ones, but good enough for rougher work. Also avoids people watching each other while they work ;-)

I am trying cut2d as we speak, easy enough it seems. I have just generated the first few tool paths with it, and fairly quick as well. Was curious if it would work well with .ai, and .dxf files Rhino3d ( my cad) put's out, but no problems I see so far.

Last edited by Fox; Thu 03 January 2013 at 14:26..
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  #9  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 16:13
danilom
Just call me: Danilo #64
 
Novi Sad
Serbia
So now the Mechmate edge quality will suit the job, Fox

Hurry up to cut the steel and order electronics your wasting time
as Sean said with everything on the pile you need 2 weeks minimum if you know every step, on one machine it took me a week 24/7 work time to put it to work after the metalwork has been completed.
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  #10  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 17:04
rischoof
Just call me: Rik #92
 
Goirle
Netherlands
fox,
welkom op het forum.
Thats a tight deadline.
I lose, or say, spent a lot of time to figure out how I want to my machine to be and which on the forum available design / solution is available and if not, design myself (z axis , gearbox, desc cnc instead of mach 3, diagnostic in he machine) find a previous proven build and copy as much as possible

going to the different shops for getting the materials is costing a lot of time.
if you miss a part you have to go back to the shop, that is costing a lot of time. be aware that some parts are not on stock and have to be delivered.
Order on line, will be delivered at home.

In my opinion it is very important for you have to find a complete as possible part list and try to order as much as possible, as soon as possible, from as less as possible suppliers

some parts you will have to buy from us or azie. (bob, spindle, stepper driver v-bearings)

buy some extra bolds and nuts so you have spare.
use a cable overview and figure out which cables and connectors you have to use or better to be quick, wire first quick and as direct as possible.
I spent a week with 2 people for my wiring and testing (longgggg days)

I learned that the machine doesn't need to look fancy to do the job.
skip painting
skip homing and use end stops (aanslagen) for zero positioning. move your machine by hand to this position
use only emo's on the button box.

on the shopbot forum (yes I look sometimes there for things things they are making) there is a topic were people with a project can look for machine owners who are willing to do the job. there are some mechmates in Holland and Belgium

when I start making products as a "fresh" operator I run into all kind of problems. it's cost me a lot of time to get used of the way of working in cad / cam programs and debug my cutting file.
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  #11  
Old Thu 03 January 2013, 17:14
bradm
Just call me: Brad #10
 
Somerville(MA)
United States of America
Sean's estimates are pretty good. I was one of the faster builds, but I already had all the electrics and computer pieces nailed from prior experience in CNC control. My steel work was close enough to Sean's daily estimates.

The red flag I will throw is that 1-2 weeks to gain enough experience to run the machine flat out for 80 hours of cutting time without errors and failed parts is aggressive. It takes a number of repetitions of running the design -> CAM -> cut -> examine -> adjust cycles until you'll know how to approach various types of cuts in various materials.

If this is a simple, outline style job with consistent depths and pieces about the same size, you can probably pull it off, especially if you're repeating the same thing on a series of sheets. If it's complicated, or the material is particularly expensive, or every sheet is different, it might be tougher to do while you're still on the learning curve.

With that said, I hope you do decide to go for it.
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  #12  
Old Fri 04 January 2013, 01:23
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
@ Danilom, I guess we'll see about that,
But remember I never said it would not do the job, I was just ASKING if it would, and being cautious and prepared before spending hard earned cash on it . Edge quality is luckily a bit less important on this specific job, but still important, because I work mainly on plastics and aluminum composites ( I see you/your friend have experience with that) where edges are in sight. I did some research the past months on the forum especially on the work people with Mechmates are making, and I think with some improvements ( belt drives, welding some parts etc) gathered from this forum, and reducing the speed where/if necessary I should be able to get the edge quality the job demands, otherwise I would not be in this predicament and asking you questions ;-) Thanks for a heads up it is possible. I find your build inspiring, and have seen you come up with some good work and solutions. A lot of guys do not visit the forum as frequent after their build ( They are probably too busy making money with it), but I really appreciate when I see experienced builders helping others out with their experience.

@ Rik
Hoi Rik, goede adviezen, precies dezelfde overwegingen maken nu ook dat ik een beetje op een tweesprong zit, waar ik dit weekend een knoop in door ga moeten hakken.
I already have a rough idea on what the machine specs will be like, and have studied the plans and such for which components I need, but I am going to decide this weekend if I am going for it. If I do, next week will be 'lost' in my planning for decision making and ordering all parts.

Which machine is actually working in the Netherlands ? I only know of 1 machine, that is still being built but not finished ? I know of two machines in Belgium. I am in contact by PM with the builder in NL but his project is sleeping/delayed for the past few years. The guys in Belgium I have tried to contact them for a visit but I don't think they are open for that ( I respect that). But it would be a massive help to be able to talk to a local Dutch guy, in terms of where ordering what and such and see the machine first hand ( mayeb even run some test). Please tip me if you know of a working machine in NL !

@ Brad, thanks for the confirmation on Sean, that's reaffirming it can be done. It's the unknown problems ( I have build some custom machines before) that eat up time. I take you warning on the 2 weeks learning experience very serious, I guess that's the second hurdle. Once the machine is build in time, it instantly needs to perform. If all goes well it should, but what if... I feel confident about the cad drawing (already there), and setting up for the material ( only one material ). What I am worried about would if you get not so easy to diagnose problems that prevent the machine from running properly/reliable.. like interference for example which I sometimes see eating up weeks on the forum..

I have a big decision to make this weekend.One of those decisions you can not say up front if it will be a smart or stupid one .. If I do jump into this... you going to be seeing a lot of me over the next few months ;-)
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  #13  
Old Fri 04 January 2013, 06:07
darren salyer
Just call me: Darren #101
 
Wentzville mo
United States of America
I'm sure we'll be watching closely, and when the inevitable head scratcher comes up, you probably won't wait long for an opinion on solving it. Lots of very helpful people here.
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  #14  
Old Fri 04 January 2013, 08:15
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
Hi Darren, thanks for the supporting words. I feel much more confident it can be done then a few days ago, but it's still quite an undertaking. It's only me and 1 co-worker here, so it's going to be a very intense first 2 months of 2013 if we attempt to pull this off. Going to do some proper calculations over the weekend for the time, with shipping delays leadtimes etc, and see if we can make it happen.

Ps. Is there an interactive version of the builders log available ( meaning if you click the name of the builder it shows their build thread ? ) Right now I am checking it by entering the name in the search box and then look for post of this person. Would be helpful to do a quick filter on the quick build threads, or those with similar specs to what I need...
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  #15  
Old Fri 04 January 2013, 09:07
bradm
Just call me: Brad #10
 
Somerville(MA)
United States of America
A couple of thoughts on the topic of interference. These do stray a little from hard proven fact and into my own personal superstitions based on past "unpleasant experiences":

A) Good quality, name brand VFD if you're going for a spindle. Absolutely NOT an HY bundled in with the spindle.

B) Ground all parts of the machine.

C) Don't skimp on the wire quality. Good shielding cabling is expensive, but worth it.

D) How high is your ceiling? If it's high enough to do a simple single hook swag for the dust collection hose I'd run the spindle line that way as well, and just keep it away from everything else in the short term - you can come back and pretty things up in the cable chain later. Bonus: time savings on your dust collection engineering for the short term.

E) Don't bother with spindle or dust collection integration into your controls, keep 'em manual to start. So just the computer, BOB, drivers, and motors as one subsystem, the spindle control as a separate subsystem, and the dust collection as a separate system. Sure, it'll cost you an extra 30 seconds a sheet to turn them on and off, but you'll avoid (or isolate) your gremlins. It'll also make it easier to diagnose when you integrate them one at a time later.
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  #16  
Old Fri 04 January 2013, 11:06
danilom
Just call me: Danilo #64
 
Novi Sad
Serbia
For quick access to the parts look for Damen CNC and Stappenmotor.nl they are in Netherlands and have quality parts.
Stappenmotor works with Deitech and can source same motors and drives along with spindle and other stuff.
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  #17  
Old Fri 04 January 2013, 18:24
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
Hi danilom, thank you.
I already was aware of these two suppliers, but thanks anyway, wondering how you know them though !? Are you related to any Dutch or ?!
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  #18  
Old Fri 04 January 2013, 19:00
rischoof
Just call me: Rik #92
 
Goirle
Netherlands
for the machines in Holland, if I remember well, Hans in badhoevendorp has build one and there has been a build in antwerpen.
For shops in Holland.
for lasercutting and metal, try "the cromvoirste" in oisterwijk. you can order lasercut parts online I think they also can deliver the other steel frame parts, but each local steel construction shop should be able to do that. (I used to live near Tilburg)

I ordered my spindle from deitech (order also a range of er20 router bit mouning collets) 4, 6,8,12 mm is most common.
try to order motors, driver (leadshine) gears, cable chain + mountings, spindle
from them. If you want to order other parts, sent Claudia from Deitech a mail she's able to deliver more than they list. I know they ship also by container to holland, but I think this will be to slow for you.

for frequency controller try marktplaats, there are always some listed. get your frequency controller programmed correctly can be tricky, buy one at a place where they can help you. bring your spindle and some hook up cables and let it run

for water cooling for your spindle, use tapwater and let it finish in the drain.
check if it is not freezing in your workshop during winter.

for electrical stuff, try conrad or rs-catalog,
If I go shopping for parts, i have always a picture downloaded from the part and the specs listed at a piece of paper to make clear what I want.

for v bearings, superior bearing in us, was not able to find something cheaper in asia,

make a bold and nut list, buy as much in one time put everything in boxes so you have clear overview of the parts you have.

and last but not least: GET A GOOD COFFEE MACHINE to survive the coming weeks if you decide to build one
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  #19  
Old Sat 05 January 2013, 01:20
danilom
Just call me: Danilo #64
 
Novi Sad
Serbia
No, I have no relatives there. I am just well informed
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  #20  
Old Sat 05 January 2013, 06:35
alan254
Just call me: Al #95
 
mystic ct
United States of America
took me 6months to read and understand toe posts

al
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  #21  
Old Sun 06 January 2013, 11:22
ger21
Just call me: Ger
 
Detroit, MI
United States of America
I don't own a mechmate, but have about 15 years programing and running big industrial CNC routers.

With a lead time that short, I'd recommend outsourcing the cutting, and invest the profits into a mechmate, that you can build at a more leisurely pace.

As Brad says, the learning curve will take considerable time. I also have a feeling that the vacuum table will not be as simple as you think. Especially when cutting small parts. Small parts can be difficult even with a very good vacuum system (25HP or more, $10,000+ pumps).
You might be better off onion skinning the entire sheet, and then using a small trim router to cut them free. But it's very difficult to give an accurate answer.
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  #22  
Old Sun 06 January 2013, 14:17
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
Hi Ger,

Normally I would totally agree with this way of sensible thinking ( I am still racking my brain over all the details calculations and possible issues as we speak). And I still might agree and not do it - because this is betting that everything works my way & not Murphies Law...)

I have also contemplated buying a machine and invest more money and less time. But.... there's no comparable machine out there that I can afford (table size 2x3 mtr) and going to the bank is out, so that option is off the table. Outsourcing or DYI it is.

The catch is of course, this outsourcing (no matter where I go in the Netherlands) cost me a lot of money; I calculated it roughly ( with material prices-machine time-bits-handling, the whole deal) and it would at least double my profit if we do the cutting ourselves (If I don't count my hours to build the Mechmate, that is). That EXTRA profit would pay for the good MechMate. If I would out source and build the Mechmate later, it would eat up almost all my profit, plus the risk that the Mechmate build will be postponed/spread out over a longer period, because of all kinds of other deadlines that get in the way-it's never quiet time in my shop.

So the goal being: investing a lot of hours over two months, and end up with making a profit on it to pay the bills, and get a nice spec mechmate as a bonus for all the hard work and extra hours. The Mechmate will serve me many years to come, and make us a lot less dependent on that cutting part when it coems to tight deadlines, prototyping etc.

Catch being:
A) I will have to work my ass off for the next two month (story of my life)
B) I am doing 'risky business' of course.... once I commit that's kind of a point of no return, and I have to live with whatever difficulties comes on our path. After I buy all the mechmate parts it would hurt financially to not continue but I could still make the decision to finish it later, but after I buy the material (50+ sheets) it becomes imperative I finish the Mechmate to do this job.


VACUUM
The small parts are not THAT small, I guess ??. Around 20-25cm diameter ?! or is that still too small to hold with an affordable vacuum ( I Can't spend 10 G's on that !) I am cutting entire sheets that cover the whole table with these small parts + bigger parts.. so I would only loose vacuum in the cuts ? It might even be possible to trow over a piece of thin pvc sheet over half the table when that side is done ?

Last edited by Fox; Sun 06 January 2013 at 14:36..
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  #23  
Old Tue 08 January 2013, 08:59
parrulho
Just call me: Paulo #108
 
willemstad
Netherlands Antilles
I believe, if you can get all parts on time, you can do it. My table is not finished and I can not speak by myself but is was done in the past:

http://www.mechmate.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1568

http://www.mechmate.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2451

http://www.mechmate.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2180


Go for it. Good luck!!!
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  #24  
Old Tue 08 January 2013, 13:53
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
Hi Paulo,

thanks for the encouraging words. I am crazy busy with running my shop and in the mean time figuring out all kinds of details to be able to pull the trigger.
I decided this weekend...CNC is coming to my shop FIRST HALF OF THIS year... but I still did not decide a 100% on doing it before this pending deadline (2 months). But figured I should at least waste no time and commence planning/gain order info right now and see if that goes wel.. if not I still have some time to back out, if it goes well it makes it easier to shell out the cash ( the first difficult thing..... building will be the next)

What I did the past 2 days/nights:

1) Researching all over the forum + cnczone for my best configuration choices, like spindles drivers guides etc.
2) Asked quote for steel + laser cutting with a friend of mine ( he might even let me use his metal shop to build the frame ). Frame will have to be 2 x 3 meters effective space, to be able to cut our plastic board sizes in one go (2050x3050mm most often)
3) Visiting hans tomorrow evening, The only other builder in the Netherlands I know of... He might not be the best to talk to about my crazy plan ( he started in 2009 and is not finished yet ;-) But he can sure help me with a lot of questions I imagine on parts and such.
4) Visiting Damen CNC tomorrow afternoon, after speaking with them on the phone today on parts and such.
5) Tested and decided I am going to use USBCNC as my controller software. Was in doubt with MACH3+smoothstepper as they have a huge userbase obviously, so more 'support' to be found online in the future. But I voted for USBCNC because of their nice interface (no issues related to serial port) and very good reviews I have read on the Dutch CNCzone and heard from DamenCNC which were all in favour of USBCNC (So I dearly hope I am one of the early adopters of a great program here, and not hit myself on the head later). Good thing is also it has a built in limited CAM, so for my first assignments ( tested with the dxf i need to cut) I might not even need to buy a CAM like cut2d, ( but might still do to be safe).
6) Taken an old XP system with TFT and started to upgrade and convert it to a dedicated CNC control system.


I will update this list BELOW here as I gain new info, and ANY help/advises/sharing of exprerience is much appreciated as I have limited time on my hands to make good decisions:

SPECS:
bolting table (future location uncertain )
2x3m cutting surface/table size (cost prices on steel+lasercutting this from my friend with metalshop, I can invest savings this in upgrading other parts)
Affordable but noisy vacuum by means of roots blower style, or maybe is I can buy a big becker pump at a very good price at an surplus ( currently negotiating).
Watercooled Chinese Spindle DTS-23 (maybe DTS-27): 2,2 KW with Delta or other good VFD (not chinese anyway)
Maybe linear guides (supported round ones or Hiwin -> need: to mill the machine then) on all axis, but definitively on Z. ( maybe...because of accuracy, and avoid time consuming grinding, costs are making me think twice )
rack and pinion driven
Z will be custom with ballscrew (and hwin linears) ( metal shop friend has CNC mill).
Leadshine AM882 Drives
4:1 belt driven gearbox
Nema 34 PK296A2A-SG3.6 or 7.2 motors ?? I must say I am not sure about this; is this a good choice with the 4:1 reduction or should I opt for PK296-F4.5A ?

(LATER ADDITIONS/UPGRADES)
USB pendant
Bill Pentz Cyclone dust extraction

Last edited by Fox; Tue 08 January 2013 at 14:22..
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  #25  
Old Tue 08 January 2013, 13:58
darren salyer
Just call me: Darren #101
 
Wentzville mo
United States of America
Ummm yeah, linear guides and ball screw z slide...... reinventing the wheel definitely won't help you meet the deadline if you go that route.
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  #26  
Old Tue 08 January 2013, 14:20
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
Thanks for the constructive criticism Darren. You are quick
Might I counter .. that I am not reinventing the wheel, these are all Mechmate improvements I have noticed here on this forum ( see below) that could suit my needs for this machine. Just as I need to decide what size of table I need, and adapt the plans to my needs, I see these points similair. But nothing has been bought/decided yet, that's why I am asking you all for your opinion, so you're advising against linear, noted.

Linear Slides on table: http://www.mechmate.com/forums/showt...=linear+slides

Linear slides/ballscrew on Z: http://www.mechmate.com/forums/showt...esigner&page=3

Bolting table: http://www.mechmate.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2359 & http://www.mechmate.com/forums/showt...light=roll+pin

Vacuum: http://www.mechmate.com/forums/showthread.php?t=849&page=3

To all....: I am merely making a list of options to contemplate if i will
A) include or not
B) Now
c) Later

so.... please chip in !

Last edited by Fox; Tue 08 January 2013 at 14:31..
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  #27  
Old Tue 08 January 2013, 14:58
darren salyer
Just call me: Darren #101
 
Wentzville mo
United States of America
I"m not here to debate whether something is an improvement or not.

Best of luck to you sir.

Last edited by darren salyer; Tue 08 January 2013 at 15:19.. Reason: just because
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  #28  
Old Tue 08 January 2013, 16:00
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
Hi Darren,

Ok, this subject is sensitive, not sure why but if for a moment you would forget that I mentioned these improvements/modifications/whatever you want to call it..

Would this reduction/motor/driver combo be any good ? I read good comments about both the Geckos and the Leadshines, and I think this digital leadshine should be able to drive this motor form their datasheet. But I am not sure if this kind of motor matches a 4:1 reduction ( even though I researched a lot of threads around here ? )

Quote:
Darren salyer
I'm sure we'll be watching closely, and when the inevitable head scratcher comes up, you probably won't wait long for an opinion on solving it. Lots of very helpful people here.
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  #29  
Old Tue 08 January 2013, 21:51
domino11
Just call me: Heath
 
Cornwall, Ontario
Canada
The SG3.6 or SG7.2 already have a 3.6 or 7.2 gear reduction built in to the motors. If you want the same motor to build a belt drive around, the F4.5 is the one to go for in the oriental motor line.
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  #30  
Old Wed 09 January 2013, 00:27
Fox
Just call me: Fox
 
Amsterdam
Netherlands
Thanks domino ! Makes sense if you know what the numbers are for...
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