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  #1  
Old Fri 05 December 2008, 23:38
lunaj76
Just call me: Justin #24
 
Littleton, (Colorado)
United States of America
Send a message via Skype™ to lunaj76
Basics of connecting E-stop Contactor & (Door) Isolator switch

We would like to get some feedback on how we have the disconnect and contactor wired.
Thanks!

http://picasaweb.google.com/Tadeo.Lu...C8&feat=email#
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  #2  
Old Fri 05 December 2008, 23:49
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
That doesn't look right. What diagrams are you using?
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  #3  
Old Sat 06 December 2008, 02:13
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
What you are trying to connect, should be like this:

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  #4  
Old Sat 06 December 2008, 17:00
vaughnluna
Just call me: Tadeo
 
Colorado
United States of America
Gerald,

This is the first post I have made. I'm Tadeo, the brother of Justin of "Brothers Build Mechmate".

I Thank you very much for your feedback. I'll make the wiring changes to match your diagram. I'm new to wiring, so I used L3 and T3 instead of 13 and 14. Also, I left off the jumper that feeds power to L1 in order to simplify things for my own understanding.

Thanks again,

Tadeo
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  #5  
Old Sat 28 February 2009, 20:45
xnaron
Just call me: Brendin
 
Edmonton
Canada
Need help understanding contactor

I picked up this contactor as pictured on ebay. I am trying to understand the contactor wiring diagram on Page 2 of the 4th PDF file (115V single phase supply americas).

I am building a modified supply that has a plug in and does not have a rotary disconnect. I think the diagram depicts a 2 phase contactor. My supply will have an On button (NO), an Off button (NC) and an Emergency Disconnect (NC). I am also wiring in an On lamp as pictured.

On my contactor are the terminals L1, L2 and L3 are for the supply? Does it matter which terminal I connect Neutral (white) to as long as I match it on the T1,T2, and T3 to the Power supply?

I am a little fuzzy on the other pair of terminals on the contactor. I believe one of them when shorted will activate the contactor and make contact betweem L1 and T1, L2 and T2, and L3 and T3. I am not sure of what the other terminal pair on the contactor is for. I have an electriconic/electronic background and am finding the schematic a little hard to understand because I don't know exactly how the contactor operates. Is there a simpler diagram floating around or can someone clarify the operation of the contactor and it's terminals?

thanks,
Brendin
Attached Images
File Type: jpg contact.jpg (17.8 KB, 1618 views)
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  #6  
Old Sat 28 February 2009, 21:15
xnaron
Just call me: Brendin
 
Edmonton
Canada
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...ayphotohosting

Just looking over the specs in the auction I don't think this contactor is going to work for me on my mains power or 115VAC at 60Hz....

Model: GMC-9 (1a1b)

AC220V 50Hz

AC3 rating (IEC60947-4)

200~240V - 2.5 kW 11A

380~440V - 4 kW 9A

500~550V - 4 kW 7A

AC1 Rating Ith : 25 A

Rating / UL508

Continuing current : 20A

Single phase: 115V 0.5hp, 230V 1hp

Three phase: 200V 2hp, 230V 2hp, 460V 5hp, 575V 7.5hp
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  #7  
Old Sat 28 February 2009, 21:31
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Does this thread help you?:
Basics of connecting Door Isolator, E-stop Contactor
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  #8  
Old Sun 01 March 2009, 08:14
jhiggins7
Just call me: John #26
 
Hebron, Ohio
United States of America
Brendin,

I found this spec document.

I don't know for sure, but I think your "coil" is rated 220 AC volts, 50 Hz.

If you only have 115 AC volts, you probably won't be able to actuate the contactor.

I believe the contacts on the right side, top of the contactor labeled NO and NC are auxiliary contacts for "latching" the contactor. NO is Normally Open and means that when the contactor is NOT ACTIVATED, the contacts are open. NC is just the reverse.

I'm also "guessing" that the two terminals in the black block at the top of the picture you provided are the "coil" contacts. They are located about half-way down the Contactor body. When power is applied to these two contacts the Contactor will activate. You could check this by checking the resistance with a VOM. It should be very low, almost like a short.

I'm pretty certain that the Contactor will require 220 Volts AC 50 Hz applied to the coil to operate reliably. It might activate with 115 Volts AC, but it will probably not be reliable.

Hope this helps. I was not able to confirm this information, so be sure to confirm it by testing.

Regards,
John
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  #9  
Old Sun 01 March 2009, 08:49
Richards
Just call me: Mike
 
South Jordan, UT
United States of America
Brendin,
The schematic that Gerald referred to will help you connect your contactor properly.

I use the same brand contactor, but a different model - GMC-18 with a 120VAC 60Hz coil.

Your contactor appears to have a 220VAC 50Hz coil and 9A contacts (240VAC). It should be perfectly usable if you can furnish about 220VAC to the coil and if you're switching 9A (or less) 1-phase power.

Edit: It looks like I hit the submit button twice and posted the message twice.

Last edited by Richards; Sun 01 March 2009 at 08:52..
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  #10  
Old Sun 01 March 2009, 09:53
xnaron
Just call me: Brendin
 
Edmonton
Canada
Thanks guys! Gerald yes that picture helps a lot. I was reading the specs last night and realized I ordered a contactor with 220V coil as pointe out by John/Richard...doh! I do have a 220 plug but it is not as close as I would like. I'll probably pick up another contactor locally and sell this one off or keep for another project.

Brendin

Last edited by xnaron; Sun 01 March 2009 at 10:01..
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  #11  
Old Mon 02 March 2009, 17:19
xnaron
Just call me: Brendin
 
Edmonton
Canada
Gerald I'm posting your contactor drawing in my thread I hope you don't mind.


On the diagram I am imagining it without a rotary disconnect. Ok so the on switch closes the circuit temporarily on the coil when pressed. It is connected to an aux NO contact which becomes closed when the coil is powered and holds the power on the coil until the off button is pressed which interrupts power to the coil. The other set of terminals, which isn't used, is a normally closed AUX connection correct? If I wanted to add a power lamp would I put it in series with the off button?
Attached Images
File Type: gif Clipboard01.gif (9.4 KB, 1567 views)

Last edited by xnaron; Mon 02 March 2009 at 17:21..
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  #12  
Old Mon 02 March 2009, 20:44
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Your understanding of the function is nice and clear. Time for you to go back to drawing 1070130C again . . . . the lamp is typically connected across (in parallel) the contactor's coil.
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  #13  
Old Tue 03 March 2009, 20:15
xnaron
Just call me: Brendin
 
Edmonton
Canada
Thanks for your help. I have the AC part done and working. I had to buy a 120VAC coil contactor (Siemens).

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  #14  
Old Sat 28 March 2009, 12:45
mrloeng
Just call me: Svein
 
Trondheim
Norway
Push buttons??

Hi!
I want to buy a 1000W power supply 230V input, 2 X 50 output and 2 x 10A.
Which switches do I need?
I will have start-stop switches, door isolator switches and E-stop switches.
I must have switches in relation to the Volt and Amp?

There are as many switch disconnectors to choose from.
I must have 2 pole switch? And Operational Current Rating 20Amp??
What about Vac on this switch disconnector??


Can I use this E-stop??:
http://no.rs-online.com/web/search/s...duct&R=6094685

Can I use this start-stop button??
http://no.rs-online.com/web/search/s...duct&R=3308543

Many questions, but hope someone can help me!
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  #15  
Old Sun 29 March 2009, 01:47
javeria
Just call me: Irfan #33
 
Bangalore
India
Did not quite understand your power supply requirements -

for controls I use a

Input : 0-230V
output : 0-18V which translates to 25VDC @ 2 AMPS and I use this for powering cooling fans (3 number), estop SW, proximities and a host of other relays
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  #16  
Old Sun 29 March 2009, 09:13
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrloeng View Post
Hi!
I want to buy a 1000W power supply 230V input, 2 X 50 output and 2 x 10A.
Please explain more about this power supply. I do not understand your description.
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  #17  
Old Sun 29 March 2009, 09:51
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Look at these for the high current control:
Contactor 758-721
Door Switch 262-3778

Those are quick selections from rs-online
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  #18  
Old Sun 29 March 2009, 10:14
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrloeng View Post
That E-stop has one N/O and one N/c contact blocks inside. We need two N/c contact blocks.

Better to buy:
http://no.rs-online.com/web/search/s...duct&R=6094679

plus:
http://no.rs-online.com/web/search/s...duct&R=0333681

but, I don't know if the two parts will fit into each other.

This shows a general problem of buying from rs-online. They are very expensive and give too many choices! Have you got a friend in Norway who can help you to select these parts from small shops in your town?
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  #19  
Old Mon 30 March 2009, 10:46
mrloeng
Just call me: Svein
 
Trondheim
Norway
I think buy this power supply Gerald.
http://no.rs-online.com/web/search/s...8421&x=11&y=12

There is no shop here with such components, so I thought it was better to see on the Internet for components.

Thanks for your advice.
Shall see if I can find a store in a neighboring city.
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  #20  
Old Mon 30 March 2009, 11:31
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Now I remember! Your are not buying a "power supply", you are buying a "transformer".

The most important switches for the transformer are the "contactor" and the "door switch". They must handle 230V and about 5 Amps for the input to the transformer. They must be 2-pole.

Therefore, the contactor does the main switching of the transformer. If you use http://no.rs-online.com/web/search/s...8-721&x=24&y=9 for the switching, you only need small 1 pole switches to switch the contactor on and off.
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  #21  
Old Tue 31 March 2009, 11:17
mrloeng
Just call me: Svein
 
Trondheim
Norway
Transformer of course! That is what it's called!
That looks good.
No I think what to buy!
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  #22  
Old Thu 22 July 2010, 20:27
PEU
Just call me: Pablo
 
Buenos Aires
Argentina
Sorry for resurfacing an old thread, I've been reading this section and the more I read the more I'm not sure what to purchase.

From various posts I see people purchasing contactors with 1NC and 1NO and also I read a post by Gerald saying that we need 2NC and 1NO

Do I need to find a contactor with 2NC and 1NO in the main unit or an auxiliary switch would do the trick?

Do you guys know a Telemecanique or Siemens model with 2NC and 1NO?

Here we use 220v and my geckos power supply will be 48VDC 17A

Saw G. post about this unit: http://www.newark.com/jsp/search/pro...p?SKU=09WX7274 but not sure if it will be enough for my needs.

Thanks!
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  #23  
Old Fri 23 July 2010, 00:35
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
Quote:
Originally Posted by PEU View Post
. . . . I read a post by Gerald saying that we need 2NC and 1NO . . . .
That doesn't feel right......can you tell me where I said that?
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  #24  
Old Fri 23 July 2010, 06:36
PEU
Just call me: Pablo
 
Buenos Aires
Argentina
this thread post 18, but now that I reread I think I misunderstood your reply there and you are referring to the switch instead of the contactor.

I see you suggested (post17) model LC1K0910U7, should I go with this model or to the next with a higher Ampere rating:

http://uk.farnell.com/telemecanique/...Ntt=LC1K1210U7

Thanks!
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  #25  
Old Fri 23 July 2010, 09:00
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
If you can afford the bigger one, and you have the space, you can decide if you want the 12 Amp compared to the 9 Amp.
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  #26  
Old Fri 23 July 2010, 09:48
PEU
Just call me: Pablo
 
Buenos Aires
Argentina
These are the local prices (in dollars)
LC1K0610M=$23.65 (6A) The M at the end is for the 220-230v range, U is for 230-240v
LC1K0901M=$26.51 (9A)
LC1K1201M=$29.51 (12A)
LC1K1601M=$39.6 (16A)

The datasheet does not show a code difference between the NO and NC models, what do I need, NC or NO?

But no need to over over engineer, the contactor Ampere rating criteria is based one the power supply or they are unrelated? [minutes later] Now that I think more about this, the secondary current is not completely related to the primary current, so I need to know what current flows in the primary when the secondary is pulling 20A at 34vac. Am I right?

After I choose one of these models I need to find the name in spanish of the door switch, Im browsing telemecanique catalog since I can find almost all of it here.
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  #27  
Old Fri 23 July 2010, 12:43
Gerald D
Just call me: Gerald (retired)
 
Cape Town
South Africa
The amount of current used by the power supply is very little (maybe 3 Amp).

But, do you also want the VFD/spindle to die if you push the e-stop switch? If "yes", then that current must also go through the e-stop contactor.

The contactor must be NO.
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  #28  
Old Fri 23 July 2010, 16:58
PEU
Just call me: Pablo
 
Buenos Aires
Argentina
Thanks Gerald, I just returned from my supplier with a LC1K1210M. Also they told me that I can order the cabinet rotary switch ABB brand, they dont stock it, it takes some days.

Contrary to what I previously said, there is a difference between the NO and NC models in the datasheet, NO is LC1K1210M and NC is LC1K1201M last two numbers are inverted.
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  #29  
Old Thu 10 March 2011, 19:49
PEU
Just call me: Pablo
 
Buenos Aires
Argentina
Today I had soem spare time and studied 10.70.230, there is something I don't understand or not sure why is done that way.

The ON button is connected in parallel with one of the N/O circuits of the contactor, why?

My guess is to relieve the ON button from some of the current in the control box, but if this were the case the ON button should have some extra resistance so the bulk of the current would go thru the contactor circuit.

Whats the actual explanation?

Thanks!
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  #30  
Old Thu 10 March 2011, 20:41
bradm
Just call me: Brad #10
 
Somerville(MA)
United States of America
Pablo, because the button is momentary and turns off again after you let go. Then the parallel contactor circuit takes over.
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