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  #1  
Old Sat 14 November 2009, 18:51
lumberjack_jeff
Just call me: Jeff #31
 
Montesano, WA
United States of America
Anyone ever heard of RepRap

http://objects.reprap.org/wiki/RepRa...I_%22Mendel%22

I think the basic idea behind this is really fascinating. Their goal is to build an open-source 3d printer which can prototype plastic parts that is capable of creating 60% of it's own parts.

I can envision a useful symbiosis between a rapid prototyper and a mechmate.

http://reprap.org/bin/view/Main/WebHome
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  #2  
Old Sun 15 November 2009, 05:11
riesvantwisk
Just call me: Ries #46
 
Quito
Ecuador
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Hey Jeff,

I have indeed heard of RepRap already a long time ago. There project is quite nice but I believe there accuracy on parts is quito low, not sure about the new version of there machine though.

There design looks rather orthodocs to me

Pure theoretically I think the mechmate can do the same as RepRap, the question is speed when you have larger designs

Ries
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  #3  
Old Sun 15 November 2009, 09:23
lumberjack_jeff
Just call me: Jeff #31
 
Montesano, WA
United States of America
What I think would be really cool is to use the technique to create complex finished parts (such as those with internal voids) using something akin to lost foam aluminum casting.

Imagine using something like polystyrene to deposit a cylinder head investment pattern, complete with water passages onto the table, rough machine the mating surfaces, combustion chamber and intake and exhaust ports.

Remove the part from the table, dip it in a refractory solution (sheet rock mud works okay) bury it in sand and cast.

The rough pattern machining mitigates most of the inaccuracy of the process.
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  #4  
Old Tue 10 August 2010, 14:28
qroger
Just call me: Roger
 
Matthews (North Carolina)
United States of America
I know this is an old dead thread, but originally I was surfing from reprap and somehow wound up here! Your post # 3 above, is the Lost Foam casting method. It was used in the original Saturn engine block castings..(I read somewhere...)

Also RepRap machine is opposite of Mechmate. It deposits melted polystyrene, I think, while Mechmate takes away wood, foam, aluminum, etc. Both systems are sort of mutated flatbed printers though.
I am a big fan of your box beam machine.
roger
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  #5  
Old Tue 10 August 2010, 16:39
Helsingtwelve
Just call me: James
 
Houston
United States of America
Hybrid composite steel

This is where we head, this our Future
http://www.dimensionprinting.com/3d-...ng-uprint.aspx

This the 80's all over + one dimension=3D. Now ABS plastics will become hybrid composite steel, and the machine will print 1/1 and we will all be more speed up + you can scan your self and make a copy of you self "Mom Look what I can do".

$14.995

God Bless America, for ever and ever.

Love

James
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  #6  
Old Tue 10 August 2010, 18:00
Art
Just call me: Art #2
 
Lancaster,Texas
United States of America
Naval use

I heard that 3Dprinters were being used by the navy on aircraft carriers. Eliminated thousands of spare parts and their storage space. They have to carry repair parts for aircraft etc. Also see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggvzcGdZsTc .

Last edited by Art; Tue 10 August 2010 at 18:02..
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  #7  
Old Tue 10 August 2010, 19:27
PEU
Just call me: Pablo
 
Buenos Aires
Argentina
A friend of mine has this exact combo at his company, I doubt you can use the part out of the machine as a replacement, but what you can do for sure is use the piece to later cast it in metal, that would do the trick.

I modeled a 3d puzzle I found online and he "printed" it on the machine, the parts are surprisingly light, a regular plastic puzzle of the same size would weight at least the double.
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  #8  
Old Wed 11 August 2010, 05:54
qroger
Just call me: Roger
 
Matthews (North Carolina)
United States of America
In ancient times, pre computer age, one of the challenges for foundarymen was shrinkage of the cast parts as they cooled. Shrinkage tables and shrinkage scales were developed so the mold makers could account for this. I think new materials and processes have been developed for duplication, so the cast parts don't shrink.
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