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  #31  
Old Tue 18 January 2011, 07:45
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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Thanks Guys.

I can see the sky clear now.

few days ago, this big boy come to home.

balma.jpg

New tool for my garage.
Adquired in one online auction.
This is one 500Litres 5.5Kw Three phase to connect to 240VAC two phase.
I think can work with two capacitors one for start and one for work.

Thanks Mechmaters.
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  #32  
Old Wed 26 January 2011, 17:37
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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News:

I have gears and rack.
Purchase this in Chiaravalli Spain. (Tel.:938440099).

2x 3Meters Rack module1 15x15 20º
2x 2Meters Rack module1 15x15 20º
10x Gears 24teetch Z=24 module1
Machined the 10 gears with 14mm shaft hole and two Grub Screws. (same company)

Selecting the Grub Screw for the Gears:

Folowing the Gerald specs about 5mm hole, we can select two type of metric pitch
(Pitch is the distance from the crest of one thread to the next)

M6x1 ------- 1mm pitch----------Diametral drill hole 5mm
M6x0.50----- 0.5mm pitch--------Diametral drill hole 5.2mm

For this application we prefer the 0.5 pitch because the screw torque in the shaft is better.

Any sugest? all is ok?

piñones.jpg

Last edited by isladelobos; Wed 26 January 2011 at 17:46..
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  #33  
Old Sat 05 February 2011, 00:48
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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Hi all.

Im making my control box but im thinking in connect the A+A-B+B- Driver signals to the Terminal Blocks or is better connect shielding cables direct to the motors.
mec.jpg
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  #34  
Old Sun 06 February 2011, 03:52
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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New box.

Refurbished from one industrial laundry.

All fit perfect, but need more terminal blocks for aplications.

The cables between drivers and Terminal blocks are 1.5mm and the cable between terminal blocks and motors 0.5mm (recomendation cable thread), but the factory cables in the motor are 1.0mm. .

Now, start the Mechanic Mechmate part.

caja.jpg

caja2.jpg
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  #35  
Old Thu 24 February 2011, 17:09
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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My new motherboard.

NX_1500_3.jpg
NX_1500_4.jpg
One Siemens Futro S400 with AMD Geode Nx1500 microprocessor 1Ghz.
12V and Compactflash i can install into the box control.


And receive 10 gears Z-24, and rack 2x3meters and 2x2meters.

piñon.jpg
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  #36  
Old Thu 24 February 2011, 18:14
Surfcnc
Just call me: Ross #74
 
Queensland
Australia
Hi Ros

Nice choice of motherboard with the embedded AMD CPU.
I ran file servers off the little VIA embedded CPU's for many years and really like the small form factor boards.
Yours looks like a ripper, AND fanless too, due to the low Thermal Design Power.

So far your are doing everything just so well - totally impressed.

Regards
Ross
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  #37  
Old Fri 25 February 2011, 14:14
jan stransky
Just call me: jstransky
 
Banovce nad Bebravou
Slovakia
PMDX 122 + 5 stppers ?

Hello,

could yoou please explain how did you contect 5 steppers to BOB with just 4 outputs ? Is such design already tested ?

Jan
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  #38  
Old Fri 25 February 2011, 14:21
bradm
Just call me: Brad #10
 
Somerville(MA)
United States of America
Parallel ports have 8 bidirectional pins, 5 inputs, and 3 other outputs (4 if you count the strobe pin, but it's not as generally accessible). Most BOBs are configured to use the 8 bidirectional pins as 4 pairs of step/direction. The remaining outputs are used for aux controls, like spindle speed, turning on dust collectors, etc. If you are willing to give up two of those pins, you can control another stepper driver with them.
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  #39  
Old Fri 25 February 2011, 14:39
smreish
Just call me: Sean - #5, 28, 58 and others
 
Orlando, Florida
United States of America
Jan,
If your machine accounts for 2 motors on the x axis, and with the appropriate stepper driver (like a G203V) you can share the step/dir signal for the x axis and drive 5 steppers on a machine and keep the 5 inputs and 3 outputs as Brad mentioned.

This will allow for an 4 axis machine to be controlled on a single parallel port. Currently, I use a PMDX 122 with x1 and x2 shared to allow for a true 4 axis machine on this board.

This does limit your use of the "autosquaring" feature in Mach3.

Sean
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  #40  
Old Fri 25 February 2011, 17:50
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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Thanks Ross, I follow your work closely.

Compactflash Card (Transcend 4GB Udma) has a 300X transfer or about 45Mb/s.
The RAM is 1GB Kingston.

jstransky.

The next connection:

Output-1 -- Motor X1 and X2
Output-2 -- Motor Y
Output-3 -- Motor Z
Output-4 -- Motor A
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  #41  
Old Tue 15 March 2011, 16:39
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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Today a new tool arrives to home.
Now more learn time.

Mechmate mechanical part construction is near.

Bimax_182.jpg
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  #42  
Old Wed 16 March 2011, 05:28
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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Hi all.

Im installing the LinuxCnc in one Compac flash and the system is the next:

Install the LinuxCNC ISO image into one USB memory
This Tool is a very good ISO to USB boot image creator.
Next restart the computer with the USB image and install this into the compact flash following This recomendations.
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  #43  
Old Wed 16 March 2011, 07:29
zumergido
Just call me: Fernando
 
BS AS
Argentina
hi ros. iam interested in put my system on a solid drive. but iam consern about the read/ write life of this devices.
i already use some systems for test on usb or SD memories. you can even put windows xp on it and its very fast.
but there is no much info about how much it last untill it fails.
saludos!
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  #44  
Old Wed 16 March 2011, 10:17
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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About the web in the link my previous post, it is mentioned 15 years?

The Corsair have a lifetime warranty for his compact flash memories.

About This Link:

Quote:
The answer is that CF cards (most of them any ways) are built around SRAM. The typical usage curve for SRAM is failure at or around (defined as +15 to -10%) 1,000,000 read/erase cycles. Soon companies will start using FRAM technology and this number will increate to: 1,000,000,000,000 read/erase cycles. So basically you will most likely be using the next "Latest and greatest" technology before your card dies. Even at a format every day your looking at something like 2,000 years of usage before failure.
And we can apply the method for writhe all the files in the ram memory instead of CF.

It is possible in the next 15 years i thinking in change the computer hardware
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  #45  
Old Wed 16 March 2011, 10:36
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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In my test with this Motherboard:

Fujitsu Siemens Futro S400
Processor AMD Geode Nx1500 microprocessor 1Ghz
4GB Transcend X300 Compactflash
So-dim 1GB DDR333 Ram
Linux CNC Ubuntu 10.04.

The Latency test give me between 10.000 and 12.000 (ns)

Remember the latency is:
(15000-20000 nanoseconds), the computer should give very nice results with software stepping.

(30.000-50.000 nanoseconds), you can still get good results, but your maximum step rate might be a little disappointing, especially if you use microstepping or have very fine pitch leadscrews.

(100,000 nanoseconds or more), then the PC is not a good candidate for software stepping.
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  #46  
Old Wed 16 March 2011, 17:21
Surfcnc
Just call me: Ross #74
 
Queensland
Australia
Hi Guys - I might just add some hard won experience to the Compact Flash discussion if I may.

Regardless of the media you boot a machine from, a backup remains the best insurance you can have.
A guarantee only replaces the media not the data.

In the final analysis, boot from what ever you like but always have another copy in the event of a failure.
This strategy also guards against the other scenario of software corruption that is equally able to stop a machine from booting.

Regards
Ross
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  #47  
Old Fri 18 March 2011, 17:26
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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Some imformation about LinuxCNC EMC2 and Leadshine DM856 configuration.

My screens.

Information:

Step Timer 2.5 us = 2500 ns
Step Space 2.5 us = 2500 ns
Direction Hold 5 us = 5000 ns
Direction Setup 5 us = 5000 ns
The base period maximun jitter is the max jitter in the Latency test.

This information is from the Leadshine DM856 DM856m.pdf Datasheet, page number 8.

Pantallazo.png

This configuration for one PMDX-122 (more configurations next finish)

Pantallazo-1.png

Leadshine DM856 are configured in 10 microsteppings.
Motors witouth reductions
Pinion gears 24 teeths

The Leadscrew pith is simple to know, we can see the Gerald speed calculator.
prueba.jpg
The marked date in mm we can multiply by our steps per revolution.
0.038x2000=76mm/rev
My max velocity is set to 167mm/s = 10.000 mm/min (aprox)

Pantallazo-2.png

I select the Leadshine DM856 for reasons:

1- Tested for other user with good results.
2- Price is good
3- Digital modern drivers.
4- Amperes digital selection or via swith.
5- Have heatsink incorporated.
6- Leadshine is a big company and ensure parts.

I hope it helps.

Last edited by isladelobos; Fri 18 March 2011 at 17:31..
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  #48  
Old Sun 20 March 2011, 13:41
chispaso
Just call me: CHISPASO
 
PALMA DE MALLORCA
Spain
hola a todos especial mente a ti roque
decirte que te estoy muy agradecido por toda la ayuda que me facilitas
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  #49  
Old Mon 21 March 2011, 15:41
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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De nada, es un placer poder ayudar.

Ya me dirás si conseguiste los corte por láser.

Decirte que por Mallorca tienes a Fred, que ha construido una Mechmate en Francia y luego la iba a trasladar a Mallorca, pero no hemos sabido mas.

Saludos y esperamos muchas fotos de tu construcción.

Last edited by isladelobos; Mon 21 March 2011 at 15:54..
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  #50  
Old Sun 03 April 2011, 06:16
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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Amperes consumption test.

Today i test the amperes consumption.

My Power Supply is one 300VA - 30V - 9A

In my tests with 5 motors:

System consumption: 5 Leadshine DM856 drivers and one PMDX-122 BOB = 1.4A
System consumption + 5 motors working (Max consumption) = 7.5A
One motor consumption = 1.2Amperes

My Power Supply is a good selection.

This is one Youtube Video. A bad quality and no sound. but we can see the amperes.
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  #51  
Old Sun 03 April 2011, 18:19
MetalHead
Just call me: Mike
 
Columbiana AL
United States of America
Cool !! Great Progress !!
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  #52  
Old Mon 04 April 2011, 00:30
KenC
Just call me: Ken
 
Klang
Malaysia
careful with the thumb drive, I fried 2 already.
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  #53  
Old Mon 04 April 2011, 02:38
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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Thanks Mike.
I only stirred the soup while waiting my next step.

Ken.

About your drivers, in the pics is M860 model. This driver recommended supply from +24VDC to +68VDC.
About your Power Supply is This? 75VDC or 65VDC (With load)

Im thinking the driver is in the limit of recomended capability or overloaded.
It is normall fried drivers.

Last edited by isladelobos; Mon 04 April 2011 at 02:54.. Reason: My bad english
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  #54  
Old Mon 04 April 2011, 03:06
KenC
Just call me: Ken
 
Klang
Malaysia
60~65V with load.
The motor drivers are still healthy & works perfect since day 1.
The drives which I fried were the Thumb Drive A.K.A. Pen drive, A.K.A. USB drive
The 1st one fried because I stripped it naked removed the casing for better ventilation, but some how it was fried, I suspect static surge killed it... & the 2nd drive was partially fried, as some of the content were corrupted & I still suspect static surge caused it, from there on I never touch the drive without grounding myself prior. better still I've never touched it for over 6 months now & its still working...
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  #55  
Old Tue 05 April 2011, 12:42
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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Ok Ken.

I have only +41VDC in my drivers, I hope not fry, their range is +20VDC to +68VDC
It is possible when put long cables between box control and motors in the table, the voltage drops some units. (to calculate)

Last edited by isladelobos; Tue 05 April 2011 at 12:45..
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  #56  
Old Tue 05 April 2011, 22:25
KenC
Just call me: Ken
 
Klang
Malaysia
41Vdc, that is seriously under utilising IMO. 5~10% below the max V is suitable & enough safe in my opinion.
I use 48Vac @500VA transformer. In theory after the voltage drop in the power supply & the stepper motor winding impedance I should get ~65VDC but in real life measurements, I get 75~78Vdc unloaded. & with load, 60~65Vdc (but mostly 60~61Vdc) depending on the mains voltage fluctuation which is still well within the drivers' operating range. Don't worry about frying the Chinese driver.
It is the flash drive that you need to take additional precautions.
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  #57  
Old Mon 11 April 2011, 04:59
isladelobos
Just call me: Ros
 
Canary Islands
Spain
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An interesting read.

PROPER FEEDING

The right feed is neither too fast nor too slow. It is the rate at
which the bit is being advanced firmly and surely to produce
a continuous spiral of uniform chips — without hogging into
the wood to make large individual chips or, on the other hand,
to create only sawdust. If you are making a small diameter,
shallow groove in soft, dry wood, the proper feed may be
about as fast as you can travel your router along your guide
line. On the other hand, if the bit is a large one, the cut is deep
or the wood is hard to cut, the proper feed may be a very slow
one. Then, again, a cross-grain cut may require a slower
pace than an identical with grain cut in the same workpiece.
There is no fixed rule. You will learn by experience. . . by
listening to the router motor and by feeling the progress of
each cut. If at all possible, always test a cut on a scrap piece
of the workpiece wood, beforehand.

fig10.jpg

RATE OF FEED

IMPORTANT: The whole "secret" of professional routing
and edge shaping lies in making a careful set-up for the cut
to be made and in selecting the proper rate of feed.

FORCE FEEDING

Clean, smooth routing and edge shaping can be done only
when the bit is revolving at a relatively high speed and is
taking very small bites to produce tiny, cleanly severed
chips. If your router is forced to move forward too fast, the
RPM of the bit becomes slower than normal in relation to its
forward movement. As a result, the bit must take bigger bites
as it revolves. “Bigger bites” mean bigger chips, and a
rougher finish. Bigger chips also require more power, which
could result in the router motor becoming overloaded.
Under extreme force-feeding conditions the relative RPM of
the bit can become so slow—and the bites it has to take so
large—that chips will be partially knocked off (rather than
fully cut off), with resulting splintering and gouging of the
workpiece. See Figure 10.
Your Router is an extremely high-speed tool (25,000
RPM no-load speed), and will make clean, smooth cuts if
allowed to run freely without the overload of a forced (too
fast) feed. Three things that cause “force feeding” are bit
size, depth-of-cut, and workpiece characteristics. The larger
the bit or the deeper the cut, the more slowly the router
should be advanced. If the wood is very hard, knotty, gummy
or damp, the operation must be slowed still more.
You can always detect “force feeding” by the sound of the
motor. Its high-pitched whine will sound lower and stronger
as it loses speed. Also, the strain of holding the tool will be
noticeably increased.

TOO SLOW FEEDING

It is also possible to spoil a cut by moving the router forward
too slowly. When it is advanced into the work too slowly, a
revolving bit does not dig into new wood fast enough to take
a bite; instead, it simply scrapes away sawdust-like particles.
Scraping produces heat, which can glaze, burn, or mar the
cut— in extreme cases, can even overheat the bit so as to
destroy its hardness.
In addition, it is more difficult to control a router when the bit
is scraping instead of cutting. With practically no load on the
motor the bit will be revolving at close to top RPM, and will
have a much greater than normal tendency to bounce off the
sides of the cut (especially, if the wood has a pronounced
grain with hard and soft areas). As a result, the cut produced
may have rippled, instead of straight sides. See Figure 10
“Too-slow feeding” can also cause your router to take off in
a wrong direction from the intended line of cut.
You can detect “too-slow feeding” by the runaway too-highly
pitched sound of the motor; or by feeling the “wiggle” of the
bit in the cut.

fig11_12.jpg

DEPTH OF CUT

As previously mentioned, the depth of cut is important
because it affects the rate of feed which, in turn, affects the
quality of a cut (and, also, the possibility of damage to your
router motor and bit). A deep cut requires a slower feed than
a shallow one, and a too deep cut will cause you to slow the
feed so much that the bit is no longer cutting, it is scraping,
instead .
Making a deep cut is never advisable. The smaller bits—
especially those only 1/16 inch (1.6 mm) in diameter —are
easily broken off when subjected to too much side thrust. A
large enough bit may not be broken off, but if the cut is too
deep a rough cut will result— and it may be very difficult to
guide and control the bit as desired. For these reasons, we
recommend that you do not exceed 1/8 inch (3.2 mm) depth
of cut in a single pass, regardless of the bit size or the
softness or condition of the workpiece. See Figure 11.
To make deeper cuts it is therefore necessary to make as
many successive passes as required, lowering the bit 1/8
inch for each new pass. In order to save time, do all the
cutting necessary at one depth setting, before lowering the
bit for the next pass. This will also assure a uniform depth
when the final pass is completed. See Figure 12.

DIRECTION OF FEED AND THRUST

The router motor and bit revolve in a clockwise direction. This
gives the tool a slight tendency to twist (in your hands) in a
counterclockwise direction, especially when the motor is
starting up.
Because of the extremely high speed of bit rotation during a
“proper feeding” operation, there is very little kickback to
contend with under normal conditions. However, should the
bit strike a knot, hard grain, foreign object, etc. that would
affect the normal progress of the cutting action, there will be
a slight kickback—sufficient to spoil the trueness of your cut
if you are not prepared. Such a kickback is always in the
direction opposite to the direction of bit rotation.
To guard against such a kickback, plan your set-up and
direction of feed so that you will always be thrusting the
tool—to hold it against whatever you are using to guide the
cut—in the same direction that the leading edge of the bit is
moving. In short, the thrust should be in a direction that keeps
the sharp edges of the bit continuously biting straight into
new (uncut) wood.

fig13.jpg

ROUTING

Whenever you are routing a groove, your travel should be in
a direction that places whatever guide you are using at the
right-hand side. In short, when the guide is positioned as
shown in the first part of Figure 13, tool travel should be left
to right and counterclockwise around curves. When the
guide is positioned as shown in the second part of Figure 13,
tool travel should be right to left and clockwise around
curves. If there is a choice, the first set-up is generally the
easiest to use. In either case, the sideways thrust you use is
against the guide.
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  #58  
Old Mon 11 April 2011, 11:36
smreish
Just call me: Sean - #5, 28, 58 and others
 
Orlando, Florida
United States of America
Ross - Nice contribution.
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  #59  
Old Mon 30 January 2012, 14:44
chispaso
Just call me: CHISPASO
 
PALMA DE MALLORCA
Spain
hola amigo de canarias
mi nombre es sergio de palma de mallorca
me podrias ayudar en como configurar esclavo en eje x de mach3
osea hacer que dos motores funcionen ala misma ves gracias
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  #60  
Old Mon 30 January 2012, 16:31
TechGladiator
Just call me: Miguel #94
 
Randolph, NJ
United States of America
Hola Chispaso;

No se si Ros anda por aqui, pero en dentro de una semana mas o menos estare configurando yo tambien mi maquina. Si quieres te do una mano.

Saludos

----
Now the english version
-----
Hey Chispaso;

I dont know if Ros is around here but I will be configuring my machine next week so if you want I will give you a hand after I do it/

Cheers
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